The Research Behind NooClear

NooClear works by providing effective doses of nootropics that give you a mental edge during your workout. Why does this "mental edge" matter? Your muscles won't contract unless your brain tells them to.
Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in muscle contractions. One way nootropics work is by allowing your body's acetylcholine levels to elevate beyond their typical levels. This provides a cognitive boost that is pertinent to the fitness goals you want to achieve. 
Some nootropics, such as rhodiola rosea and ginkgo biloba, are also adaptogens. Adaptogens are botanical compounds that support and balance adrenal gland function [10] while having the potential to "stabilize physiological processes and encourage homeostasis in the body" [11]. In other words, adaptogens help your body adapt to the stress put on it.
Here are some of the key ingredients in NooClear along with the benefits they can provide:
  • Rhodiola Rosea: an adaptogen that can support memory and attention, protect nervous system from free radicals, increase physical work capacity, and shorten recovery time [1]
  • Ginkgo Biloba: an adaptogen that has been shown to improve speed of attention and quality of memory [2], and can promote feeling more alert and content [3]
  • Theobromine: a chemical occurring naturally in cocoa, theobromine can inhibit cough without negative effects on the cardiovascular or central nervous system [4]; increase HDL (“good”) cholesterol and lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol [5]; and does not act via the central nervous system like a regular stimulant would [5], [9]
  • Ginkgo Biloba and Rhodiola Rosea have a more significant effect on cognitive function when used together than they would alone [7]
  • The combination of caffeine and theobromine results in a longer lasting feeling of alertness than each would have on its own [8]
  • While caffeine alone causes an increase in blood pressure, the combination of caffeine and theobromine was shown to negate or minimize this [8]

 

 

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[1] P. Brown, Richard & Gerbarg, Patricia & Ramazanov, Zakir. (2002). Rhodiola rosea: A Phytomedicinal Overview. Herbal Gram. 56.

[2] Kennedy, D., Scholey, A. & Wesnes, K. Psychopharmacology (2000) 151: 416. https://doi.org/10.1007/s002130000501

[3] O Kennedy, D & Scholey, Andrew & Wesnes, Keith. (2002). Modulation of cognition and mood following administration of single doses of Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, and a ginkgo/ginseng combination to healthy young adults. Physiology & behavior. 75. 739-51. 10.1016/S0031-9384(02)00665-0.

[4] Omar S. Usmani, Maria G. Belvisi, Hema J. Patel, Natascia Crispino, Mark A. Birrell, Márta Korbonits, Dezső Korbonits, and Peter J. Barnes. Theobromine inhibits sensory nerve activation and cough. The FASEB Journal 2005 19:2, 231-233

[5] Nicole Neufingerl, Yvonne EMP Zebregs, Ewoud AH Schuring, Elke A Trautwein; Effect of cocoa and theobromine consumption on serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations: a randomized controlled trial, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 97, Issue 6, 1 June 2013, Pages 1201–1209, https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.047373

[7] Al-Kuraishy, H. M. (2016). Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy. Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, 5(1), 7–13. http://doi.org/10.5455/jice.20151123043202
[8] Mitchell, Ellen & Slettenaar, M & vd Meer, N & Transler, C & Jans, Linda & Quadt, F & Berry, M. (2011). Differential contributions of theobromine and caffeine on mood, psychomotor performance and blood pressure. Physiology & behavior. 104. 816-22. 10.1016/j.physbeh.2011.07.027.

[9] Baggott, M.J., Childs, E., Hart, A.B. et al. Psychopharmacology (2013) 228: 109. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-013-3021-0

[10] Sanford H. Levy, Chapter 48 - Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Editor(s): David Rakel, Integrative Medicine (Fourth Edition), Elsevier, 2018, Pages 484-492.e2, ISBN 9780323358682. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-35868-2.00048-7.

[11] Jacqueline Redmer, Chapter 39 - Adrenal Fatigue, Editor(s): David Rakel, Integrative Medicine (Fourth Edition), Elsevier, 2018, Pages 404-409.e1, ISBN 9780323358682, https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-35868-2.00039-6.

 

 

 

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